Archbishops of Canterbury 597 – Present Day

Archbishops of Canterbury Timeline

This timeline gives a chronological listing of the Archbishops of Canterbury

Names in brackets were elected or appointed but were deposed or did not take up the position.

597 CE – 26th May 604
Augustine
Was sent to England by Pope Gregory the Great to Christianise Kent. He was later canonised.
after May 604 – 2nd February 619
Laurence
Came to England with Augustine. He was canonised after his death.
after February 619 – 24th April 624
Mellitus
Was Bishop of London before his appointment and was canonised after his death.
after April 624 – 10th November 627
Justus
Was Bishop of Rochester before his appointment and was canonised after his death.
after 10th November 627 – 30th September 653
Honorius
Came to England with Augustine. He was canonised after his death.
March 655 – 14th July 664
Deusdedit
He was the first Anglo-Saxon Archbishop of Canterbury. He was canonised after his death.
around 666 – 668
(Wighard)
He died of the plague before he could be consecrated as Archbishop of Canterbury.
26th March 668 – 19th September 690
Theodore
Was born in Tarsus but left after it was conquered by Persia. Was sent to Canterbury after being appointed Archbishop. Established the first school in Canterbury.
29th June 693 – 13th January 731
Berhtwald
Elected Archbishop of Canterbury after the see had been vacant for three years. He was canonised after his death.
10th June 731 – 30th July 734
Tatwine
A former Benedictine monk, he spent much time writing. He was canonised after his death.
during 735 – 17th October 739
Nothelm
Was an archpriest of St Paul’s before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury. He corresponded with Bede and was canonised after his death.
around 740 – 26th October 760
Cuthbert
Was an abbot of a monastic house and may have been Bishop of Hereford. He built a new church in Canterbury, He was canonised after his death.
27th September 761 – during 764
Bregowine
Little is known of his life before becoming Archbishop. He was elevated by Aethelbert II of Kent and was canonised after his death.
2nd February 765 – 12th August 792
Jaenberht
Was formerly abbot of St Augustine’s Abbey in Canterbury. He was canonised after his death.
21st July 793 – 12th May 805
Aethelhard
Was Bishop of Winchester prior to being appointed Archbishop of Canterbury by King Offa of Mercia. He was canonised after his death.
October 805 – 21st March 832
Wulfred
Thought to have been a nobleman from Middlesex who was elected to the See of Canterbury.
8th June 832 – 30th August 832
Feologild
He was an abbot of a monastery before being elected Archbishop of Canterbury. He died soon after taking up the position.
27th July 833 – 4th February 870
Ceolnoth
Nothing is known of his life before becoming Archbishop. During his tenure he had to contend with Viking attacks in his See.
during 870 – 30th June 888
Aethelred
Nothing is known of his life prior to becoming Archbishop of Canterbury. He clashed with Alfred the Great over church reform and was plagued by Viking raids.
during 890 – 2nd August 923
Plegmund
He was a Mercian and a scholar and had been summoned to court by Alfred the Great. King Alfred appointed him to the See of Canterbury after it had been vacant for nearly two years. He was canonised after his death.
around 924 – 8th January 926
Athelm
Was formerly the first Bishop of Wells. As Archbishop of Canterbury he crowned King Aethelstan. He was canonised after his death.
around 926 – 12th February 941
Wulfhelm
Was Bishop of Wells before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury. He advised King Aethelstan on the drafting of new laws.
during 941 – 2nd June 958
Oda
He was the son of a Danish Viking and Bishop of Ramsbury before becoming Archbishop. He was canonised after his death.
during 958 – during 959
Aelfsige
Formerly Bishop of Winchester he died in the Alps as he travelled to Rome to be given his pallium.
during 959
Byrhthelm
He was a monk of Glastonbury Abbey and Bishop of Wells before being appointed Archbishop of Canterbury by King Eadwig. When Eadwig died, King Edgar deposed Byrhthelm and sent him back to Wells.
during 959 – 19th May 988
Dunstan
Was abbot of Glastonbury, Bishop of Worcester and Bishop of London before being appointed Archbishop of Canterbury by King Edgar. He officiated at Edgar’s coronation and pushed for church reform. He was a member of the Witan (the council that made important governmental decisions) and helped to settle disputes over who should succeed King Edgar. He officiated at the coronation of King Aethelred the Unready, his last official duty. He was canonised after his death.
during 988 – February 990
Aethelgar
Was Bishop of Selsey before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury. He died less than two years after taking office.
during 990 – 28th October 994
Sigeric the Serious
As a boy he received his education at Glastonbury Abbey and decided to become a monk. He was elected abbot of St Augustine’s and later became Bishop of Ramsbury. As Archbishop of Canterbury, he advised King Aethelred the Unready to pay off the Danes.
21st April 995 – 16th November 1005
Aelfric of Abingdon
A former monk he served as abbot of St Alban’s Abbey and then Abingdon Abbey. He was then Bishop of Ramsbury, a position that he held at the same time as being Archbishop of Canterbury.
during 1006 – 19th April 1012
Aelfheah
He was abbot of Bath Abbey and Bishop of Winchester before being elected to the See of Canterbury. He was murdered by Viking raiders and canonised after his death.
during 1013 – 12th June 1020
Lyfing
Formerly abbot of Chertsey Abbey and Bishop of Wells, he was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury by Aethelred the Unready. He was captured by Vikings but later released.
13th November 1020 – 29th October 1038
Aethelnoth
He was a monk at Glastonbury, dean of Canterbury Cathedral and chaplain to King Cnut before becoming Archbishop.
during 1038 – 29th October 1050
Eadsige
Served as a priest to King Cnut, a monk at Christ Church, Canterbury and bishop to Archbishop Aethelnoth of Canterbury. He was elected Archbishop after Aethelnoth’s death. He crowned King Edward the Confessor in 1043. He witnessed the rise of Earl Godwin and his family and either sold, leased or gave Godwin lands formerly owned by the See of Canterbury.
March 1051 – September 1052
Robert of Jumieges
He was the first Norman Archbishop having become a close aquaintance of Edward the Confessor while Edward was in exile in Normandy. He was appointed Bishop of London before being appointed Archbishop of Canterbury. He was relieved of his position and fled to Normandy after Earl Godwin returned from exile with an army and forced King Edward to remove Normans from positions of power.
during 1052 – 11th April 1070
Stigand
Formerly a royal Chaplain and adviser to King Cnut, Harold Harefoot, Harthacnut and Edward the Confessor, he became Bishop of Elmham and Bishop of Winchester before being elected Archbishop of Canterbury. He was deposed by William the Conqueror and imprisoned at Winchester
29th August 1070 – 28th May 1089
Lanfranc
He was a Benedictine monk at Bec in Normandy before becoming abbot of St Etienne, Caen, Normandy. He was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury by William I following the Norman Conquest.
28th May 1089 – 4th December 1093
Vacant
4th December 1093 – 21st April 1109
Anselem of Bec
He was an Italian Benedictine monk at Bec and Abbot of St Etienne, Caen, Normandy before being appointed Archbishop of Canterbury. He was a learned man with an interest in philosophy, metaphysics and theology. He published many works and was canonised after his death.
21st April 1109 – 26th April 1114
Vacant
26th April 1114 – 2nd October 1122
Ralph d’Escures
Served as Abbot of Seez and Bishop of Rochester before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury.
18th February 1123 – 21st November 1136
William de Corbeil
He was born in Corbeil, Paris before serving in England as clerk to the bishops of Druham and London. He then became a priest and chaplain to Ralph d’Escures before being elected to the See of Canterbury.
21st November 1136 – 8th January 1139
Vacant
8th January 1139 – 18th April 1161
Theobald of Bec
He was a monk and then abbot at the Abbey of Bec before being chosen as Archbishop of Canterbury by King Stephen. During the Civil War between Stephen and Henry I’s daughter Matilda, he supported Stephen until he was captured then supported Matilda after Stephen was captured. He presided over negotiations that resulted in Stephen being released in exchange for Matilda’s half-brother Robert of Gloucester then switched allegiance back to Stephen. He crowned King Henry II and his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine. He conflicted with King Henry II over the issue of whether the clergy should be tried in ecclesiastical or secular courts.
18th April 1161 – 3rd June 1162
Vacant
3rd June 1162 – 29th December 1170
Thomas Becket
Born in London and a close friend of Henry II, he served as Archdeacon of Canterbury and Chancellor of England before being appointed as Archbishop. He came into conflict with King Henry II over the issue of church reform and the trial of clergymen in secular courts. Becket exiled himself to France after refusing to agree to weaken links with Rome. He returned to England after a compromise but angered the King by excommunicating clergymen who had crowned Henry II’s son, Henry the Young King. Becket was assassinated in Canterbury Cathedral by four knights who believed the King wanted the Archbishop dead.
29th December 1170 – 7th April 1174
Vacant
during 1173
(Roger de Bailleul)
Abbot of Le Bec-Hellouin, he was elected to the See of Canterbury but declined the post.
7th April 1174 – 16th February 1184
Richard of Dover
He was a Benedictine monk, Prior of Dover Priory and chaplain to Theobald of Bec before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury.
December 1184 – November 1190
Baldwin of Forde
He was a Cistercian monk and abbot of the monastery at Forde before becoming Bishop of Winchester. He was appointed Archbishop by Henry II. He officiated at the coronation of Richard I and then helped to raise money for the Third Crusade He travelled to the Holy Land ahead of Richard I where he died.
27th November 1191 – 26th December 1191
(Reginald Fitz Jocelin)
He was a clerk to Thomas Becket and served Henry II before being appointed abbot of the Abbey of Corbeil by Louis VII of France. He was appointed Bishop of Bath but his appointment was challenged by Henry the Young King. While in Rome fighting his case he was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury but he died before he could take up the appointment.
26th December 1191 – 29th May 1193
Vacant
29th May 1193 – 13th July 1205
Hubert Walter
Served as Bishop of Salisbury and accompanied Richard I on the Third Crusade. He helped raise the ransom money after Richard I was captured on his return. He was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury, Chief Justiciar of England and Lord Chancellor for his loyal service.
before October 1205 – before December 1206
(Reginald)
Former sub-prior of Canterbury Cathedral, he was elected to succeed Hubert Walter but the election was quashed by the Pope.
December 1205 – 30th March 1206
(John de Gray)
He was Bishop of Norwich when King John tried to appoint him to the See of Canterbury as a reward for his service to the King. Pope Innocent III quashed his selection due to a disputed election with Reginald.
17th June 1207 – 9th July 1228
Stephen Langton
Cardinal Stephen Langton was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury by the Pope against the wishes of King John. The resulting dispute between John and the Pope contributed to the composition of Magna Carta which John was forced to sign in 1216.
3rd August 1228 – January 1229
(Walter d’Eynsham)
Former monk of Christ Church Priory in Canterbury, he was elected Archbishop of Canterbury by the monks but his appointment was overruled by King Henry III and Pope Gregory IX.
10th June 1229 – 3rd August 1231
Richard le Grant
He was chancellor of the see of Lincoln when he was appointed Archbishop by King Henry III.
22nd September 1231 – 20th December 1231
(Ralph Neville)
Served as Bishop of Chichester and Lord Chancellor of England before being elected to the See of Canterbury. He did not take up the appointment for reasons unknown.
16th March 1232 – 12th June 1232
(John of Sittingbourne)
He was a monk of Christ Church Priory, Canterbury when he was elected as Archbishop. However, his election was quashed.
26th August 1232 – 1st June 1233
(John Blund)
He was a philosopher who taught at Oxford University and was a canon of Chichester before being elected Archbishop of Canterbury. His election was not approved by the Pope.
2nd April 1234 – 16th November 1240
Edmund Rich
He was a scholar and lecturer in Mathematics when he took holy orders. He was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury by Pope Gregory IX. He was made a saint after his death.
1st February 1241 – 14th July 1270
Boniface of Savoy
Former Bishop of Belley in France, he was appointed to the See of Canterbury by King Henry III. He was made a saint in 1839.
9th September 1290 – summer 1272
(William Chillenden)
Former Prior of Christ Church he was elected to the See of Canterbury but the election was quashed by the Pope.
26th February 1273 – 5th June 1278
Robert Kilwardby
Former Bishop of Porto and Santa Rufina, he was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury by Pope Gregory X.
around July 1278 – January 1279
(Robert Burnell)
Former Bishop of Bath and Wells and Lord Chancellor of England, he was elected as Archbishop but was set aside by the Pope due to having a long term mistress.
19th February 1279 – 8th December 1292
John Peckham
He was a Friar at Lewes Priory before attending the University of Paris and becoming a lecturer in theology at Oxford University. As Archbishop of Canterbury he worked to stop abuses by the clergy.
12th September 1294 – 11th May 1313
Robert Winchelsea
A former theologian, he was Chancellor of Oxford University before being elected Archbishop of Canterbury.
28th May 1313 – 1st October 1313
(Thomas Cobham)
Former Archdeacon of Lewes, he was elected to the See of Canterbury by the monks of Christ Church Priory, Canterbury but the election was overruled because King Edward II wanted to appoint Walter Reynolds to the position.
1st October 1313 – 16th November 1327
Walter Reynolds
Former Bishop of Worcester and Lord Chancellor, he was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury by King Edward II.
5th June 1328 – 12th October 1333
Simon Mepeham
He was a student of theology before becoming a priest and Archbishop of Canterbury. He was excommunicated by the Pope after refusing to attend a judicaial court.
3rd November 1333 – 23rd August 1348
John de Stratford
He was Archdeacon of Lincoln. Bishop of Winchester and Lord Chancellor before being appointed to the See of Canterbury. He died of the plague.
24th September 1348 – 20th May 1349
(John de Ufford)
Served King Edward III as Lord Chancellor before being appointed Archbishop of Canterbury. He died of the plague before he was consecrated.
19th July 1349 – 26th August 1349
Thomas Bradwardine
He was a scholar and member of the court before being appointed Archbishop. He died of the plague before he could be consecrated.
20th December 1349 – 26th April 1366
Simon Islip
He was Prebendary of St Paul’s Cathedral, secretary to King Edward III and Keeper of the Privy Seal before being appointed Archbishop of Canterbury.
during 1366
(William Edington)
Former Bishop of Winchester, he was elected to the See but refused the appointement.
24th July 1366 – 28th November 1368
Simon Langham
Former Bishop of Ely, he was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury but resigned in 1368.
11th October 1368 – June 1374
William Whittlesey
He was Bishop of Rochester and Bishop of Worcester before being appointed to the See of Canterbury.
4th May 1375 – 14th June 1381
Simon Sudbury
He was Bishop of London before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury. He became Lord Chancellor in 1381 and was attacked by a mob during the Peasant’s Revolt and beheaded.
31st July 1381 – 31st July 1396
William Courtenay
Former Bishop of London and Lord Chancellor before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury.
25th September 1396 – during 1397
Thomas Arundel
He was Archbishop of York and Lord Chancellor before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury. He was charged with treason by King Richard II and deposed from the position.
8th November 1397 – 19th October 1399
Roger Walden
Former Archdeacon of Winchester and Treasurer of Calais, he was appointed to replace Thomas Arundel who had been exiled for treason.
19th October 1399 – 19th February 1414
Thomas Arundel
Was reinstated as Archbishop of Canterbury when Henry IV deposed Richard II.
12th March 1414 – 12th Arpil 1443
Henry Chichele
Former Bishop of St David’s (Wales) before becoming Archbishop. He founded All Souls College, Oxford.
13th May 1443 – 25th May 1452
John Stafford
He was Bishop of Bath and Wells, Lord Chancellor and Lord Treasurer before being appointed to the See of Canterbury. He retained his position as Lord Chancellor until 1450.
21st July 1452 – 22nd March 1454
John Kemp
Former Bishop of Rochester, Archbishop of York and Lord Chancellor. He was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury by King Henry VI for his service as Lord Chancellor. He died in office.
23rd April 1454 – 30th March 1486
Thomas Bourchier
Became Archbishop of Canterbury following the death of John Kemp. He was previously Bishop of Worcester and served as Lord Chancellor. He crowned King Edward IV, Richard III and Henry VII. He remained in office until he died.
6th October 1486 – 15th September 1500
John Morton
Former Bishop of Ely, he was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury following the death of Bourchier. He also served Henry VII as Lord Chancellor.
22nd January 1501 – 27th January 1501
(Thomas Langton)
He was Bishop of Winchester before being appointed Archbishop of Canterbury. He died before he was consecrated as Archbishop.
26th April 1501 – 17th February 1503
Henry Deane
He was Bishop of Salisbury before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury. He died while in office.
29th November 1503 – 22nd August 1532
William Warham
Formerly Bishop of London, Warham also served as Lord Chancellor for the first 12 years of his time as Archbishop of Canterbury.
30th March 1533 – 13th November 1555
Thomas Cranmer
He was the first Protestant Archbishop of Canterbury and was appointed by Henry VIII for finding a solution to the Divorce Crisis. He was excommunicated by the Pope for being a heretic after Mary I restored Catholicism to England and was burnt at the stake.
22nd March 1556 – 18th November 1558
Reginald Pole
He was the last Roman Catholic Archbishop of Canterbury and was appointed to replace Thomas Cranmer. He died in office.
17th December 1559 – 17th May 1575
Matthew Parker
Former Dean of Lincoln, he was chosen as Archbishop of Canterbury because he was a moderate. He died while in office.
29th December 1575 – 6th July 1583
Edmund Grindal
He was Archbishop of York before being appointed to the See of Canterbury. He was placed under house arrest for disagreeing with Queen Elizabeth I but died before he could be prosecuted.
14th August 1583 – 29th February 1604
John Whitgift
He was bishop of Worcester before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury. He was fiercely against the Puritan movement. He crowned King James I and died while in office.
9th October 1604 – 2nd November 1610
Richard Bancroft
Former Bishop of London, he became Archbishop after the death of Whitgift. He also served as Chancellor of the University of Oxford before dying at Lambeth Palace.
4th March 1611 – 4th August 1633
George Abbot
He had been Bishop of London before being appointed to the See of Canterbury. In 1621 he accidently killed someone when he was hunting deer, a fact which was used against him by his opponents. He crowned King Charles I and died in office.
6th August 1633 – 10th January 1645
William Laud
He was formerly Bishop of London and was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury by King Charles I. He leaned towards Catholicism and was arrested in 1640 and executed in 1645.
10th January 1645 – 2nd September 1660
Vacant
2nd September 1660 – 4th June 1663
William Juxon
Held a variety of posts before becoming Archbishop, including Bishop of Hereford, Bishop of London, Lord High Treasurer and First Lord of the Admiralty. He died while in office.
16th June 1663 – 9th November 1677
Gilbert Sheldon
He was Bishop of London before being appointed Archbishop of Canterbury. He died in office.
27th January 1678 – 1st February 1690
William Sancroft
Former Dean of St Paul’s Cathedral, he was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury but was deprived of the See after he refused to swear an oath of allegiance to William III and Mary II after the Glorious Revolution.
31st May 1691 – 22nd November 1694
John Tilotson
He was Dean of St Paul’s before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury. He died in office.
6th December 1694 -14th December 1715
Thomas Tenison
He was Bishop of Lincoln before being appointed to the See of Canterbury. He crowned Queen Anne and King George I. He died while in office.
17th December 1715 – 24th January 1737
William Wake
He was Bishop of Lincoln before being appointed Archbishop of Canterbury. He died in office.
9th February 1737 – 10th October 1747
John Potter
Former Bishop of Oxford and Chaplain to Queen Anne, he was appointed to the See of Canterbury after the death of William Wake. He was a devotee of High Anglicanism and published a number of works. He died in office.
21st October 1747 – 13th March 1757
Thomas Herring
He was Archbishop of York and chaplain to King George II before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury. He held the position until his death.
29th March 1757 – 19th March 1758
Matthew Hutton
He was Archbishop of York before translating to the See of Canterbury. He died within a year of his appointment. 
8th March 1758 – 3rd August 1768
Thomas Secker
Former Bishop of Oxford and Dean of St Paul’s Cathedral he was Archbishop of Canterbury for ten years. He championed the establishment of an Anglican church in America and died in office. 
12th August 1768 – 19th March 1783
Frederick Cornwallis
He was chaplain to King George II, Bishop of Lichfield and a Secretary of State before being appointed Archbishop of Canterbury, a position he held until his death.  
31st March 1783 – 18th January 1805
John Moore
Former Bishop of Bangor he became Archbishop after the death of Frederick Cornwallis. He held the position until his death. 
1st February 1805 – 21st July 1828
Charles Manners-Sutton
He was Bishop of Norwich before translating to the See of Canterbury. As Archbishop he christened Princess Victoria in 1819. He died while in office. 
6th August 1828 – 11th February 1848
William Howley
He was Bishop of London before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury. He was disliked by the people for opposing the Great Reform Act. He crowned King William IV and his wife, Adelaide in 1831 and was a member of the deputation that told Princess Victoria that she was Queen in 1837. 
17th February 1848 – 6th September 1862
John Bird Sumner
He was Bishop of Chester before translating to the See of Canterbury. He favoured Catholic emancipation, a view which caused conflict with other members of the clergy. Sumner was president of the Canterbury Association which founded the town of Christchurch in New Zealand.  
20th October 1862 – 28th October 1868
Charles Longley
He was Archbishop of York before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury. He chaired the first ever global conference of Anglican Bishops.  
28th November 1868 – 1st December 1882
Archibald Campbell Tait
Former Headmaster of Rugby School and Bishop of London he succeeded Longley as Archbishop of Canterbury and held the position until his death.
13th January 1883 – 11th October 1896
Edward White Benson
He was Bishop of Truro before being appointed to the See of Canterbury. He died of heart failure while in office. 
9th November 1896 – 22nd December 1902
Frederick Temple
He was Bishop of London before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury. He called for unity within the Anglican Church. He officiated at the Coronation of King Edward VII and Alexandra of Denmark
14th January 1903 – 12th November 1928
Randall Davidson
Former Bishop of Rochester and Bishop of Winchester he crowned King George V and Queen Mary. He was Archbishop during the First World War and championed the cause of ‘enemy aliens’ in Britain. He was the first Archbishop to retire from office.
13th November 1928 – 31st March 1942
Cosmo Gordon Lang
He translated to the See of Canterbury from York. During the Abdication Crisis of 1936 he insisted that Edward VIII had to abdicate if he wanted to marry Wallis Simpson. He was Archbishop when World War Two broke out but resigned in 1942 to allow a younger man to take over the position. 
1st April 1942 – 26th October 1944
William Temple
Former Archbishop of York, Temple took over after Lang retired. His father was Frederick Temple who had served as Archbishop of Canterbury from 1896 – 1902. He died in office. 
12th January 1945 – 31st May 1961
Geoffrey Fisher
He was Bishop of London before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury. He crowned Queen Elizabeth II in 1953. He retired from office in 1961. 
1st June 1961 – 15th November 1974
Michael Ramsey
He was Archbishop of York before translating to the See of Canterbury. He was critical of the rise of the evangelical movement and saw the first women priests ordained during his time as Archbishop of Canterbury. He retired his position at the age of 70 years. 
18th November 1974 – 25th January 1980
Donald Coggan
He was Archbishop of York before taking over as Archbishop of Canterbury. He was 65 years old when he became Archbishop and retired at the age of 70 years. 
1st February 1980 – 31st January 1991
Robert Runcie
Former Bishop of St Albans, he was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury after the retirement of Donald Coggan. He officiated at the marriage of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer in 1981. He retired his position at the age of 70. 
19th April 1991 – 31st October 2002
George Carey
He was Bishop of Bath and Wells before being appointed to the See of Canterbury. He opposed moves to legalise same-sex marriage believing it undermined traditional society. He retired in 2002. 
2nd December 2002 – 31st December 2012
Rowan Williams
He was Bishop of Monmouth and Archbishop of Wales before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury. Williams worked to maintain unity in the Anglican Church in the face of ordination of women and same-sex marriage. He officiated at the marriage of Prince William and Catherine Middleton in 2011 and retired a year later.
4th February 2013 – Present Day
Justin Welby
An educated man, he worked in the oil industry before deciding he wanted to be ordained. He served as Bishop of Durham before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury.  

 

Published Jul 26, 2019 @ 12:35 pm – Updated – Jul 26, 2019 @ 12:51 pm

 

Harvard Reference for this page:

Heather Y Wheeler. (2019). Archbishops of Canterbury 597 to Present Day. Available: https://www.totallytimelines.com/archbishops-of-canterbury-597-to-present-day. Last accessed August 20th, 2019