King George I of Great Britain 1660 – 1727

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King George I

 

Father – Ernest Augustus Elector of Hanover
Mother – Sophia of the Palatinate
Spouse – Sophia Dorothea of Celle
Children – George, Sophia

King of Great Britain 1714 – 1727
Predecessor – Queen Anne
Successor – George II

 

1660 (28th May)
King George I was born George Ludwig to Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg and Sophia of the Palatinate, granddaughter of King James I of England at Hanover.
1661 (3rd October)
George’s brother, Frederick Augustus, was born to Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg and Sophia of the Palatinate at Hanover.
1664 (during)
George’s mother was absent for much of the year in Italy.
1665 (during)
George’s mother returned from Italy.
1666 (13th December)
George’s brother, Maximilian William, was born to Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg and Sophia of the Palatinate at Hanover.
1668 (12th October)
George’s sister, Sophia Charlotte, was born to Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg and Sophia of the Palatinate at Hanover.
1669 (3rd October)
George’s brother, Charles Philip, was born to Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg and Sophia of the Palatinate at Hanover.
1671 (19th September)
George’s brother, Christian, was born to Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg and Sophia of the Palatinate at Hanover.
1674 (7th September)
George’s brother, Ernest Augustus, was born to Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg and Sophia of the Palatinate at Hanover.
1675 (during)
George accompanied his father on campaign in the Franco-Dutch War.
1682 (21st November)
George married Sophia Dorothea of Celle, daughter of George William, Duke of Brunswick at Celle Castle Chapel, Germany.
1683 (during)
George and his brother Frederick Augustus saw action in the war against the Turks.
1683 (30th October)
A son, George Augustus, was born to George and Sophia Dorothea at Schloss Herrenhausen, Hanover.
1684 (during)
George fell out with his brothers after it was announced that the family would adopt primogeniture, the principle that the eldest son inherited his father’s title and estate.
1685 (16th March)
A daughter, Sophia Dorothea, was born to George and Sophia Dorothea at Schloss Herrenhausen, Hanover.
1688 (around)
George began an extra-marital affair with his wife’s maid of honour, Melusine von der Schulenburg while his wife, Sophia Dorothea began a relationship with Philip Christoph von Konigsmarck, a Swedish nobleman.
1690 (31st December)
George’s brother, Charles Philip, was killed fighting the Turks.
1690 (31st December)
George’s brother, Frederick Augustus was killed fighting the Turks.
1692 (January)
A daughter, Louise Sophia von der Schulenburg, was born to George and his mistress, Melusine von der Schulenburg.
1693 (during)
A daughter, Melusina von der Schulenburg, was born to George and his mistress, Melusine von der Schulenburg.
1694 (during)
George’s wife’s lover, Swedish count Philip Christoph von Konigsmarck was killed. It is thought likely that George’s father had engineered the murder to avoid a scandal.
1694 (28th December)
George divorced his wife on the grounds of desertion after she refused to live under the same room as him.
1695 (early)
George’s wife was banished to the Castle of Ahlden and was forbidden to remarry.
1698 (23rd January)
George became Elector of Hanover after his father died. He was styled Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg.
1700 (30th July)
William Duke of Gloucester, second in line to the throne of Britain after his mother Anne, died of hydroencephalus. This made George’s mother, Sophia, second in line to the throne since she was the closest living Protestant member of the Royal Family.
1701 (during)
A daughter, Margarethe Gertrud von Oeynhausen, was born to George and his mistress, Melusine von der Schulenburg.
1701 (12th June)
Act of Settlement
This act stated that the British succession would pass to the heirs of George’s mother, Sophia, Electress of Hanover, Protestant granddaughter of James I if Anne died without an heir.
1701 (18th June)
George was made a Knight of the Garter.
1702 (8th March)
King William III of Great Britain died from pneumonia. He was succeeded by his sister-in-law Anne. George’s mother became heir to the throne.
1703 (31st July)
George’s brother, Christian, drowned in the River Danube.
1705 (during)
George and his children were made British subjects.
1705 (during)
George became ruler of Luneburg-Grubenhagen after his uncle died.
1705 (21st January)
George’s sister, Sophia Charlotte, died at Hanover.
1705 (22nd August)
George’s son, George Augustus, married Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach, known as Caroline of Ansbach.
1706 (4th April)
George’s son, George Augustus, was made a Knight of the Garter.
1706 (9th November)
George’s son, George Augustus, was created Duke of Cambridge, Earl of Milford Haven, Viscount Northallerton and Baron of Tewkesbury.
1714 (during)
Great Northern War
George, as Elector of Hanover, joined an anti-Swedish alliance of Russia, Denmark and Saxony.
1714 (28th May)
George’s mother, Sophia, died. Her death meant that George was now heir to the throne of Britain.
1714 (1st August)
George became King of Great Britain after his cousin, Queen Anne, died without issue. His son, George Augustus, became heir to the throne and was created Duke of Cornwall and Rothesay.
1714 (18th September)
Having been kept in The Hague due to unfavourable weather, George finally reached Britain.
1714 (27th September)
George’s son, George Augustus, was invested as Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester.
1714 (20th October)
George was crowned King of Great Britain at Westmnister Abbey.
1715 (22nd January)
A General Election returned a Whig government led by a Whig Junto of several members of the party. Most prominent were Robert Walpole, Lord Townshend, Lord Stanhope and Lord Sunderland.
1715 (27th August)
Jacobite Rebellion
John Erskine, Earl of Mar, former Tory member of the government supported the overthrow of George and his replacement by Queen Anne’s half-brother, James Francis Stuart.
1715 (6th September)
Jacobite Rebellion
John Erskine, Earl of Mar, raised the standard of James III and VIII. John Campbell, Duke of Argyll raised troops loyal to the crown.
1715 (October)
Jacobite Rebellion
John Erskine, Earl of Mar, had taken control of the Scottish Highlands.
1715 (13th November)
Jacobite Rebellion – Battle of Sheriffmuir
The Jacobites led by the Earl of Mar met the forces of the Duke of Argyll. Despite being outnumbered 2-1 by the Jacobites, the Royal army managed to hold them off and the battle was inconclusive. Many of the Jacobite supporters were disheartened at their army’s failure to win the battle.
1715 (23rd December)
Jacobite Rebellion
James Francis Stuart arrived at Peterhead from France but was unable to rekindle enthusiasm for his cause.
1716 (4th February)
Jacobite Rebellion
James Francis Stuart and the Earl of Mar left Scotland and fled to France.
1716 (May)
Septennial Act
This Act extended the length of a parliament from three to seven years.
1716 (3rd July)
George’s brother, Ernest Augustus, was made a Knight of the Garter.
1716 (5th July)
George’s brother, Ernest Augustus, was created Duke of York and Albany and Earl of Ulster.
1717 (during)
Triple Alliance
George was instrumental in securing this alliance between Great Britain, France and the Dutch Republic.
1717 (late)
George quarrelled with his son over the appointment of the Duke of Newcastle as a godparent against his son’s wishes. He told his son and daughter-in-law to leave St James’s Palace but they were not allowed to take their children with them.
1719 (13th April)
Jacobite Uprising
With the support of King Philip of Spain and Spanish troops there was a new Jacobite uprising. They succeeded in recruiting a number of Scottish highlanders but they were poorly equipped.
1719 (during)
South Sea Bubble
The South Sea Company took on three-fifths of the British national debt.
1719 (10th June)
Jacobite Uprising – Battle of Glenshiel
The Jacobite/Spanish army met British troops led by Joseph Wightman and George Munro at Glen Shiel. The Jacobites were no match for the British and were defeated. The Spanish surrendered while the Scottish highlanders fled to their homes.
1720 (1st January)
South Sea Bubble
The South Sea Company encouraged their bondholders to convert their bonds to shares in the company at a preferential price of £128.
1720 (May)
South Sea Bubble
The South Sea Company began trading and shares in the company rose to £500.
1720 (11th June)
South Sea Bubble – Bubble Act
The government passed this act that forbade the formation of joint stock companies.
1720 (24th June)
South Sea Bubble
Shares in the company were now worth £1050.
1720 (August)
South Sea Bubble
People began selling their shares in the company causing prices to fall drastically.
1720 (late September)
South Sea Bubble
Shares in the company had fallen to £150 and a large number of people lost a lot of money. They blamed the loss on King George and the government.
1720 (November)
George returned to Britain from Hanover to deal with the aftermath of the South Sea Bubble crisis.
1721 (during)
Robert Walpole became the first Prime Minister of Britain (although the title was not yet used). He helped to deal with the aftermath of the South Sea Bubble crisis. He also urged George to effect a reconciliation with his son and heir.
1725 (during)
George revived the Order of the Bath.
1725 (30th April)
Treaty of Hanover
This was an alliance between Britain, France and Prussia against Spain, Naples, Austria, Hungary and Russia.
1726 (13th December)
George’s brother, Maximilian William died at Vienna, Austria.
1727 (28th May)
George died in Hanover following a stroke. He was succeeded by his son George Augustus as King George II.

 

 

Published Nov 18, 2018 @ 2:25 pm – Updated – Jan 12, 2019 @ 8:32 pm

 

Harvard Reference for this page::

Heather Y Wheeler. (2018). King George I of Great Britain 1660 – 1727. Available: https://www.totallytimelines.com/king-george-i-of-great-britain-1660-1727. Last accessed September 23rd, 2019

 

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