Tudor Executions 1485 – 1603

Tudor ExecutionsIt is estimated that around 85,000 people were executed during the reigns of the Tudor Monarchs. This timeline details the most notable Tudor executions.

See also: The Tudor Period 1485 – 1603

Tudor executions during the reign of King Henry VII 1485 – 1509
1485 (25th August)
William Catesby aged about 35 years
William Catesby was a Chief minister of King Richard III. He was executed three days after the Battle of Bosworth Field.
1486 (8th July)
Humphrey Stafford aged about 59 years
Stafford was a Yorkist who had fought in the Wars of the Roses. He attempted to overthrow King Henry VII but was caught and executed at Tyburn.
1494 (28th April)
Joan Boughton aged about 84 years
Joan Boughton was an elderly widow who supported the ideas of the religious reformer John Wycliffe. Se was executed by being burnt at the stake.
1495 (30th January)
Simon Mountford age unknown
Mountford was a lord who supported the pretender to the throne, Perkin Warbeck. He was caught and executed.
1495 (16th February)
William Stanley aged about 60 years
Stanley was the younger brother of Henry VII’s step-father. He had supported King Richard III but changed sides at the Battle of Bosworth and fought for Henry Tudor. He was executed by beheading for supporting the pretender to the throne, Perkin Warbeck.
1497 (27th June)
Michael An Gof aka Michael Joseph age unknown
An Gof was hanged drawn and quartered at Tyburn along with Thomas Flamank for leading the Cornish Rebellion against taxes imposed by Henry VII.
1497 (27th June)
Thomas Flamank age unknown
Thomas Flamank, a lawyer, was hanged drawn and quartered at Tyburn along with Michael An Gof for leading the Cornish Rebellion against taxes imposed by Henry VII.
1497 (28th June)
James Tuchet, Baron Audley aged about 34 years
James Tuchet was beheaded for taking part in the Cornish Rebellion against taxes imposed by Henry VII.
1499 (12th February)
Ralph Wulford aged about 20 years
Ralph Wulford was executed for claiming to be Edward, Earl of Warwick, nephew of King Edward IV.
1499 (23rd November)
Perkin Warbeck aged about 25 years
Warbeck had claimed to be Richard Duke of York, younger son of King Edward IV. He had been defeated and imprisoned but while in the Tower he had conspired with Edward Earl of Warwick. Perkin Warbeck was hanged at Tyburn.
1499 (28th November)
Edward, Earl of Warwick aged 24 years
Edward was the nephew of King Edward IV and had been imprisoned because he was a claimant to the throne and a threat to Henry VII. After conspiring with Perkin Warbeck he was executed by beheading on Tower Hill.
1502 (6th May)
Sir James Tyrrell
James Tyrrell was a trusted servant of King Richard III. He was arrested for supporting the Yorkist, Edmund de la Pole and was executed. Thomas More later stated that while being questioned Tyrrell confessed to the murder of the Princes in the Tower, Edward V and Richard Duke of York.
Tudor executions during the reign of King Henry VIII 1509 – 1547
1510 (17th August)
Edmund Dudley aged about 45 years
Dudley was one of Henry VII’s chief ministers who, together with Richard Empson had been responsible for raising taxes. Dudley had been very unpopular and was charged with constructive treason (a crime that was felt to be tantamount to treason) when Henry VIII became King. He was executed by beheading on Tower Hill.
1510 (17th August)
Sir Richard Empson aged about 60 years
Empson was one of Henry VII’s chief ministers who, together with Edmund Dudley had been responsible for raising taxes. Empson had been very unpopular and was charged with constructive treason (a crime that was felt to be tantamount to treason) when Henry VIII became King. He was executed by beheading on Tower Hill.
1513 (30th April)
Edmund de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk aged about 42 years
Edmund’s mother, Elizabeth, was the younger sister of King Edward IV. Although born a Yorkist he fought for King Henry VII against the Cornish rebels. He exiled himself to France and was proclaimed an outlaw. He was captured in 1502, stripped of his title and imprisoned in the tower. He was executed by beheading before Henry VIII left England for France.
1521 (17th May)
Edward Stafford Duke of Buckingham aged 43 years
Stafford was the son of Elizabeth Woodville’s sister, Catherine and therefore nephew of King Edward IV. He was loyal to King Henry VIII and fought with him in France and attended the Field of the Cloth of Gold Summit. In 1521 Stafford was found guilty of listening to prophecies of the King’s death and determining to kill the King. He was executed by beheading on Tower Hill.
1531 (December)
Rhys ap Gruffydd aged 23 years
Gruffydd was a powerful Welsh landowner. He was angered after Henry VIII gave his grandfather’s estates and titles to Walter Devereux. This caused violent conflict between Gruffydd and Devereux. Gruffydd was charged with treason for plotting with James V of Scotland to become Prince of Wales and was executed.
1534 (20th April)
Elizabeth Barton aka The Nun of Kent aged 28 years
Elizabeth Barton was a Catholic nun who, in 1532, began publicly prophesying that King Henry VIII would die and go to hell if he married Anne Boleyn. She was arrested in 1533 and charged with treason for conspiring to bring down the King. She was hanged at Tyburn along with her chief supporters.
1534 (20th April)
Edward Bocking, Benedictine monk aged about 39 years
Bocking was a supporter of the nun, Elizabeth Barton who, prophesied that King Henry VIII would die and go to hell if he married Anne Boleyn. Bocking was arrested in 1533, charged with treason and hanged at Tyburn.
1534 (20th April)
Richard Risby, Franciscan friar aged about 35 years
Risby was a supporter of the nun, Elizabeth Barton who, prophesied that King Henry VIII would die and go to hell if he married Anne Boleyn. Risby was arrested in 1533, charged with treason and hanged at Tyburn.
1535 (4th May)
John Houghton age unknown
Houghton was a Carthusian monk at the London Charterhouse. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered for refusing to swear the Oath of Succession.
1535 (4th May)
Robert Lawrence age unknown
Lawrence was a Carthusian monk at Epworth, Lincolnshire. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered for refusing to swear the Oath of Succession.
1535 (4th May)
Augustine Webster age unknown
Webster was a Carthusian monk at the London Charterhouse. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered for refusing to swear the Oath of Succession.
1535 (19th June)
Humphrey Middlemore age unknown
Middlemore was a Carthusian monk at the London Charterhouse. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered for refusing to swear the Oath of Succession.
1535 (19th June)
William Exmew age unknown
Exmew was a Carthusian monk at the London Charterhouse. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered for refusing to swear the Oath of Succession.
1535 (19th June)
Sebastian Newdigate aged 35 years
Newdigate was a Carthusian monk at the London Charterhouse. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered for refusing to swear the Oath of Succession.
1535 ((22nd June)
Bishop Fisher was executed by beheading for refusing to swear the Oath of Succession.
1535 (6th July)
Thomas More was a committed Catholic who had been appointed Chancellor of England after the fall of Thomas Wolsey. He was beheaded at Tower Hill for refusing to swear the Oath of Succession.
1536 (17th May)
George Boleyn Viscount Rochford aged 32 years
George Boleyn was the brother of Anne Boleyn, second wife of King Henry VIII. He was charged with treason for committing incest with his sister. He was found guilty and executed by beheading.
1536 (17th May)
Henry Norris aged 53 years
Norris was King Henry VIII’s Groom of the Stool. He was charged with treason for committing adultery with Anne Boleyn. He was found guilty and executed by beheading.
1536 (17th May)
William Brereton aged 48 years
Brereton was a Groom of the Privy Chamber of Henry VIII. He was charged with treason for committing adultery with Anne Boleyn. He was found guilty and executed by beheading.
1536 (17th May)
Francis Weston aged 25 years
Weston was a Gentleman of the Privy Chamber of Henry VIII. He was charged with treason for committing adultery with Anne Boleyn. He was found guilty and executed by beheading.
1536 (17th May)
Mark Smeaton aged about 23 years
Smeaton was a musician at the court of Henry VIII. He was charged with treason for committing adultery with Anne Boleyn. He was found guilty and executed by beheading.
1536 (19th May)
Anne Boleyn aged 35 years
Anne Boleyn was the second wife of Henry VIII. She failed to give Henry a son and he wanted to marry Jane Seymour. Anne was tried and found guilty of committing adultery with Henry Norris, William Brereton, Francis Weston, Mark Smeaton and her brother George Boleyn. All five men were executed. Anne was beheaded by a swordsman who had been summoned from Calais on Tower Green.
1537 (early)
John Hussey aged about 70 years
Hussey was Chamberlain to Henry VIII’s daughter, Mary. He was charged with supporting and taking part in the Pilgrimage of Grace, a rebellion against the closure of the monasteries. Although he protested his innocence, he was found guilty and executed by beheading in Lincoln.
1537 (3rd February)
Thomas FitzGerald Earl of Kildare aged 24 years
The FitzGeralds were a leading Irish noble family. Thomas’s father had been summoned to London in 1534 and it had been rumoured that he had been executed. Thomas publicly renounced his allegiance to King Henry VIII as Lord of Ireland and mounted a rebellion. He was captured and sent to the Tower of London before being hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn.
1537 (11th May)
John Rochester aged about 39 years
Rochester was a Carthusian monk from the London Charterhouse who had refused to take the Oath of Succession and had been sent to Hull. Following the Pilgrimage of Grace rebellion against the closure of the monasteries, Rochester was hanged in York and his body left to rot on the city battlements.
1537 (11th May)
James Walworth age unknown
Walworth was a Carthusian monk from the London Charterhouse who had refused to take the Oath of Succession and had been sent to Hull. Following the Pilgrimage of Grace rebellion against the closure of the monasteries, Rochester was hanged in York and his body left to rot on the city battlements.
1537 (2nd June)
Sir Thomas Percy aged about 33 years
Thomas Percy was a member of the powerful Percy family of Northumberland. His brother, Henry, had been betrothed to Anne Boleyn but was forced to recant the betrothal by Thomas Wolsey. He was charged with treason for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace (rebellion against the closure of the monasteries) and Bigod’s Rebellion. He was hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn.
1537 (2nd June)
Sir Francis Bigod aged 33 years
Bigod became a ward of Thomas Wolsey at the age of 7 years after the death of his father. He later entered the service of Wolsey. Although a Protestant he opposed the King’s intervention in religion and joined the Pilgrimage of Grace (rebellion against the closure of the monasteries). He then launched his own rebellion in January 1537. He was captured, found guilty of treason and hanged at Tyburn.
1537 (30th June)
Thomas Darcy aged about 70 years
Darcy was one of the leaders of the Pilgrimage of Grace (rebellion against the closure of the monasteries). He was captured and sent to the Tower of London with Robert Aske and Robert Constable. He was found guilty of treason and executed by beheading on Tower Hill.
1537 (6th July)
Sir Robert Constable aged 59 years
Constable was one of the leaders of the Pilgrimage of Grace (rebellion against the closure of the monasteries). He was captured and sent to the Tower of London with Robert Aske and Thomas Darcy. He was sent north and exhibited as a traitor along the way before being executed by hanging in Hull.
1537 (12th July)
Robert Aske aged 37 years
Robert Aske was the acknowledged leader of the Pilgrimage of Grace (rebellion against the closure of the monasteries). He was captured and sent to the Tower of London with Robert Constable and Thomas Darcy. He was sent north and exhibited as a traitor along the way. He was hanged in chains from Clifford’s Tower in York Castle and left to die.
1537 (20th September)
Johnson was a Carthusian monk of the London Charterhouse and had been arrested for refusing to sign the Oath of Supremacy. He was imprisoned in Newgate Prison and left to starve to death.
1538 (April)
Mabel Brigge aged 32 years
Mabel was found guilt for having a black fast (a fast taken with the intention of causing evil). She was said to have fasted in order to cause the death of King Henry VIII and Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk. She was executed.
1538 (22nd November)
Lambert was a friend of William Tynedale and a Protestant. He was accused of heresy and executed by being burned at the stake at Smithfield.
1538 (8th December)
Edward Neville age unknown
Neville was a knight and member of the King’s household. Although Neville was a Catholic and supported Catherine of Aragon he initially escaped persecution. After the Pilgrimage of Grace (rebellion against the closure of the monasteries) Neville was charged with treason for supporting Cardinal Reginald Pole. He was found guilty and executed by beheading on Tower Hill.
1538 (9th December)
Henry Courtenay, Marquess of Exeter age about 40 years
Courtenay was a grandson of King Edward IV and cousin to Henry VIII. He was sent by the King to put down the Pilgrimage of Grace (rebellion against the closure of the monasteries) but failed in his mission. Thomas Cromwell saw Courtenay as a rival and managed to convince Henry VIII that he was in league with Cardinal Reginald Pole. He was executed by beheading by sword on Tower Hill.
1539 (9th January)
Henry Pole aged around 47 years
Henry Pole was the grandson of King Edward IV’s brother George. He was a knight and a member of the court that tried Anne Boleyn. Henry Pole was arrested, along with other members of his family. He was charged with treason for supporting his brother Cardinal Reginald Pole. He was found guilty and executed by beheading on Tower Hill.
1539 (3rd March)
Nicholas Carew aged
Carew was a member of the king’s household and a skilled jouster. He undertook diplomatic missions for the king. In 1538 he became angry after a comment by the King. Cromwell used this to persuade Henry VIII that Carew was involved in a plot to remove him and put Reginald Pole on the throne. He was found guilty and executed by beheading on Tower Hill.
1539 (14th November)
Hugh Faringdon age unknown
Faringdon was a Benedictine monk and Abbot of Reading Abbey. He wrote to the Pope urging him to grant Henry VIII a divorce to spare England what might happen otherwise. In 1539 Faringdon was found guilty of financially supporting the northern rebels. He was hanged, drawn and quartered at Reading Abbey.
1539 (15th November)
John Rugg age unknown
Rugg was an associate of Hugh Faringdon. He was found guilty of hiding one of the most famous relics of Reading Abbey at the time of the dissolution. He was found guilty and executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered at the gateway of Reading Abbey.
1539 (15th November)
John Eynon age unknown
Eynon was a Benedictine monk and pastor of ST Giles Church in Reading. He supported the Pilgrimage of Grace (rebellion against the closure of the monasteries) and refused to surrender his parish to the King’s commissioners. He was accused of treason and executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered at the gateway to Reading Abbey.
1540 (28th July)
Thomas Cromwell Earl of Essex aged about 55 years
Thomas Cromwell rose to become Lord Chancellor after suggesting the English Reformation to help Henry VIII secure a divorce from Catherine of Aragon. He later engineered the downfall of Anne Boleyn. He fell from favour after arranging Henry VIII’s marriage to Anne of Cleves. He was charged with treason on a number of counts and proclaimed guilty without a trial. He was executed by beheading on Tower Hill.
1540 (30th July)
Thomas Abel aged about 43 years
Abel had been chaplain to Catherine of Aragon. He opposed the King’s divorce, refused to take the Oath of Succession and was imprisoned in December 1533. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered at Smithfield.
1540 (30th July)
Richard Featherstone age unknown
Featherstone had been chaplain to Catherine of Aragon and tutor to Princess Mary. He opposed the King’s divorce, refused to take the Oath of Supremacy and was imprisoned in December 1534. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered at Smithfield.
1540 (30th July)
Edward Powell aged about 62 years
Powell was a court preacher who had helped Henry VIII write his reply to Martin Luther. He opposed the King’s divorce, refused to take the Oath of Succession and was imprisoned in November 1534. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered at Smithfield.
1540 (4th August)
Giles Heron aged about 38 years
Giles Heron was Thomas More’s son-in-law. He became involved in a dispute with a tenant who then maliciously reported Heron as a heretic. He was found guilty of treason and executed by being hanged at Tyburn.
1541 (27th May)
Margaret Pole Countess of Salisbury aged 68 years
Margaret Pole was the niece of King Edward IV and served as lady-in-waiting to Catherine of Aragon. Her son, Reginald had entered the church and opposed the divorce and the English Reformation. He had exiled himself abroad and had further angered Henry VIII after he had been created Cardinal and supported the Pilgrimage of Grace (rebellion against the closure of the monasteries). Margaret’s son Henry had been executed in 1539 and she had been imprisoned in the Tower of London. She was executed by beheading on Tower Hill.
1541 (15th June)
Sir John Neville aged 53 years
Neville was a member of the court and had served with Henry VIII in France. He had helped to suppress the Pilgrimage of Grace (rebellion against the closure of the monasteries). He was arrested and charged with treason for failing to report a conspiracy against the king. He was executed by beheading.
1541 (28th July)
Leonard Grey aged about 50 years
Grey served as Lord Deputy of Ireland. His sister married the Earl of Kildare and was mother of Gerald FitzGerald, young Earl of Kildare. Grey was accused of allowing his nephew to escape to France in 1539. He was found guilty and executed by beheading at the Tower of London.
1541 (10th December)
Francis Dereham aged about 33 years
Dereham had a relationship with Kathryn Howard before she became queen. He asked Kathryn to find him employment at court and he became her Private Secretary. He was found guilty of committing adultery with the queen and was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn.
1541 (10th December)
Thomas Culpeper aged about 27 years
Culpeper was a member of the court and friend of Henry VIII. He was related to Kathryn Howard and often met with Kathryn once she was queen. He was found guilty of committing adultery with the queen and was executed by being beheaded at Tyburn.
1542 (13th February)
Kathryn Howard fifth wife of Henry VIII aged 19 years
Kathryn was a lady-in-waiting to Anne of Cleves before becoming his fifth wife. She was accused of committing adultery with Thomas Culpeper and Francis Dereham and imprisoned in the Tower of London. She was executed by beheading on Tower Green.
1542 (13th February)
Jane Boleyn aged 37 years
Jane had been the wife of George Boleyn, brother to Anne Boleyn. She had been lady-in-waiting to Jane Seymour and Anne of Cleves before being appointed to the household of Kathryn Howard. She was accused of treason for aiding and abetting Kathryn to commit adultery. She was executed by beheading on Tower Green.
1544 (7th March)
Germain Gardiner age unknown
Gardiner was the nephew of Stephen Gardiner, leader of the Conservative faction at court. He was a Catholic and opposed to Archbishop Cranmer. He became involved in a plot to remove Cranmer from power. Cranmer subsequently had him charged of conspiring with Reginald Pole. He was found guilty and executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn.
1546 (16th July)
Anne Askew aged 25 years
Askew was a Protestant who was accused of heresy and imprisoned in the Tower of London. She was tortured but refused to recant or reveal names of other Protestants. She was executed by burning at Smithfield.
1547 (19th January)
Henry Howard Earl of Surrey aged 30 years
Howard was the son of Thomas Duke of Norfolk. He was a courtier and cousin to Anne Boleyn and Kathryn Howard. He was critical of those commoners that had risen during the reign of Henry VIII, particularly Cromwell. Henry VIII believed that Howard wanted to take the throne for himself and he was accused of treason. He was executed by beheading.
Tudor Executions during the reign of King Edward VI
1549 (20th March)
Thomas Seymour aged about 41 years
Thomas Seymour was the younger brother of Jane Seymour and uncle of King Edward VI. His brother Edward was Lord Protector of England as Edward was a minor. He had married Katherine Parr but had a flirtatious relationship with Henry VIII’s daughter Lady Elizabeth. After Katherine Parr died Thomas tried to bring his brother down and take power himself. He was found guilty of treason and executed by beheading.
1549 (7th December)
Robert Kett aged about 57 years
Robert Kett and his brother William were leaders of a rebellion against the hardships caused by enclosure of common land and the policies of Edward Seymour. He was captured and found guilty of treason. He was executed by hanging at Norwich.
1549 (7th December)
William Kett age unknown
Willian Kett and his brother Robert were leaders of a rebellion against the hardships caused by enclosure of common land and the policies of Edward Seymour. He was captured and found guilty of treason. He was executed by hanging at Norwich.
27th January 1550
Humphrey Arundell aged about 47 years
Arundell was a Catholic Cornishman who rose in rebellion against the introduction of the Book of Common Prayer. The Prayer Book Rebellion was defeated and he was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn.
1552 (22nd January)
Edward Seymour Duke of Somerset aged about 52 years
Edward Seymour was the brother of Jane Seymour, third wife of King Henry VIII, and the uncle of King Edward VI. He ruled as Lord Protector because Edward was a minor. Seymour’s decision to enclose common land led to revolts against his rule. This was used by the council to accuse Seymour of mismanagement in 1549. When alerted of the move against him, Seymour seized King Edward VI and took him to Windsor Castle. Seymour was arrested and John Dudley, Earl of Warwick took over as leader of the Council. Seymour was released from prison but after plotting to overthrow Dudley he was arrested, charged with treason and executed by beheading.
Tudor Executions in the reign of Queen Mary I
1553 (22nd August
John Dudley Duke of Northumberland aged 49 years
Dudley had taken over as Protector of England after the fall of Edward Seymour. Dudley married his son, Guildford, to Jane Grey, granddaughter of Henry VIII’s sister, Mary. When Edward was on his deathbed it was decided that Protestant Lady Jane Grey should be Queen rather than Catholic Mary. Henry VIII’s will had stipulated that after his son Edward the crown should pass to Mary and then Elizabeth. The people rose for Mary and Jane Grey was overthrown after just 9 days. John Dudley was found guilty of treason and executed by beheading.
1553 (22nd August
John Gates aged 49 years
John Gates was a courtier and strong supporter of John Dudley. After the death of Edward VI he helped to place Jane Grey on the throne. But the people rose for Mary and Jane Grey was overthrown after just 9 days. Gates was found guilty of treason and executed by beheading.
1553 (22nd August
Thomas Palmer age unknown
Thomas Palmer was a courtier and strong supporter of John Dudley. After the death of Edward VI he helped to place Jane Grey on the throne. But the people rose for Mary and Jane Grey was overthrown after just 9 days. Palmer was found guilty of treason and executed by beheading.
1554 (12th February)
Lady Jane Grey aged 17 years
Jane Grey was the granddaughter of King Henry VIII’s sister, Mary. She was married to John Dudley’s son, Guildford and chosen to be Queen by Edward VI and the council because she was Protestant. However, the people rose for Henry VIII’s daughter Mary. Recognising that Jane had been used by her father-in-law she was imprisoned. Early in 1554, Jane’s father joined a rebellion led by Thomas Wyatt against Queen Mary. Mary decided that Jane was a focus for revolt and she was executed by beheading.
1554 (12th February)
Lord Guildford Dudley aged about 19 years
Guildford Dudley was the son of John Dudley, Lord Protector of King Edward VI during his latter years. He was married to Jane Grey, the granddaughter of King Henry VIII’s sister, Mary. Jane Grey was chosen to be Queen by Edward VI and the council because she was Protestant. However, the people rose for Henry VIII’s daughter Mary. Recognising that Guildford had been used by his father he was imprisoned. Early in 1554, Jane’s father joined a rebellion led by Thomas Wyatt against Queen Mary. Mary decided that Jane and Guildford were a focus for revolt and could not remain alive. Guildford was executed by beheading.
1554 (23rd February)
Henry Grey Duke of Suffolk aged 37 years
Henry Grey was the father of Lady Jane Grey who had been chosen to be Queen by Edward VI and the council because she was Protestant. However, the people rose for Henry VIII’s daughter Mary. Early in 1554, Henry Grey joined a rebellion led by Thomas Wyatt against Queen Mary. He was captured and executed by beheading.
1554 (February)
Henry Isley age unknown
Henry Isley was a nobleman who joined a rebellion led by Thomas Wyatt against Queen Mary. He was captured and executed by beheading.
1554 (11th April)
Thomas Wyatt the Younger aged 33 years
Thomas Wyatt the younger was the son of the poet, Thomas Wyatt. In January 1554 he organised a revolt against the marriage of Queen Mary I to Philip of Spain. The revolt was suppressed, Wyatt was captured and found guilty of treason. He was executed by beheading.
1554 (18th May)
William Thomas age unknown
William Thomas was a scholar and courtier who joined a rebellion led by Thomas Wyatt against Queen Mary. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered.
1555 (4th February)
John Rogers aged about 50 years
John Rogers was a Protestant clergyman who had helped to translate the Bible into English. Queen Mary I was determined to restore England to Catholicism and passed legislation that allowed the burning of Protestant heretics. Rogers was the first to be executed by burning under this new legislation.
1555 (9th February)
John Hooper aged about 60 years
John Hooper was Protestant Bishop of Gloucester and Worcester. He was prosecuted under new legislation against Protestants. Hooper was executed by burning in Gloucester.
1555 (27th March)
William Hunter aged 19 years
William Hunter was a Protestant living in Brentwood. He was executed by burning at Smithfield.
1555 (1st July)
John Bradford aged 45 years
John Bradford was Protestant prebendary of St Paul’s Cathedral. He was charged under the new legislation of Queen Mary I that allowed the burning of Protestant heretics. Bradford was executed by burning at Smithfield.
1555 (16th October)
Nicholas Ridley aged about 55 years
Nicholas Ridley was Protestant Bishop of London. He was charged under the new legislation introduced by Queen Mary I against Protestants. Ridley was executed by burning in Oxford.
1555 (16th October)
Hugh Latimer aged about 68 years
Hugh Latimer was Protestant Bishop of Worcester. Queen Mary I was determined to restore England to Catholicism and passed legislation that allowed the burning of Protestant heretics. Latimer was executed by burning in Oxford.
1556 (21st March)
Thomas Cranmer aged 67 years
Thomas Cranmer was Protestant Archbishop of Canterbury who had been a leader of the English Reformation under King Henry VIII. Under King Edward VI he had helped to introduce the Book of Common Prayer. He fell from favour during the reign of Queen Mary I because he was a Protestant. Cranmer was executed by burning in Oxford.
Tudor Executions in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I
1570 (8th August)
John Felton age unknown
John Felton was a Catholic. After the Pope issued a bull of excommunication on Queen Elizabeth I, Felton hung a copy of the document on the gates of the Bishop of London’s palace. He was charged with treason and tortured to reveal names of other heretics. He was executed by being hanged in St Paul’s Churchyard, London.
1571 (January)
Thomas Plumtree age unknown
Plumtree was a Catholic who joined the northern rising to depose Elizabeth and celebrated a Catholic mass in Durham Cathedral. He was caught and executed.
1571 (1st June)
John Story aged 67 years
John Story was a Roman Catholic member of Parliament who had escaped to Flanders in 1563 to escape persecution. He was abducted in Flanders and returned to England. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn.
1572 (2nd June)
Thomas Howard Duke of Norfolk aged 36 years
Howard was the son of Henry Howard who had been executed in January 1547. He was the grandson of Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk and inherited the title when his grandfather died. Thomas Howard was implicated in the Ridolfi Plot which sought to depose Elizabeth and put Mary Queen of Scots on the English throne. He was found guilty of treason and executed by beheading on Tower Hill.
1572 (22nd August)
Thomas Percy Earl of Northumberland aged 44 years
Thomas Percy was a Catholic and head of the Percy family of Northumberland. He led a northern uprising to depose Queen Elizabeth and replace her with Mary Queen of Scots. He was captured, found guilty of treason and executed by beheading at York.
1581 (1st December)
Edmund Campion aged 41 years
Campion was a Catholic Jesuit priest preaching in London. The English government had banned the Jesuit order. Campion was arrested and executed by being hanged drawn and quartered at Tyburn.
1581 (1st December)
Alexander Briant aged 25 years
Briant was a Catholic Jesuit priest preaching in Somerset. The English government had banned the Jesuit order. Briant was arrested and executed by being hanged drawn and quartered at Tyburn.
1581 (1st December)
Ralph Sherwin aged 29 years
Campion was a Catholic Jesuit priest preaching around the country. The English government had banned the Jesuit order. Sherwin was arrested and executed by being hanged drawn and quartered at Tyburn.
1584 (10th July)
Sir Francis Throckmorton aged 30 years
Francis Throckmorton was the leader of a plot to depose Queen Elizabeth I and replace her with Catholic Mary Queen of Scots. He confessed the conspiracy after being tortured. He was executed by beheading.
1585 (2nd March)
William Parry age unknown
Parry was a Welshman and a courtier. He was also a spy for the government and found out about the activities of Catholics. He converted to Catholicism and plotted the assassination of Queen Elizabeth I. He was found guilty of treason and executed at Westminster.
1586 (25th March)
Margaret Clitherow aged 30 years
Margaret Clitherow was a Roman Catholic who helped to shelter Catholic priests and also allowed mass to be held in her home. She was arrested but refused to enter a plea of guilty or not guilty which meant she could not be tried. In order to exact a plea she was laid on on the floor, covered with the door to her house and then heavy rocks were placed on top until she died.
1586 (20th September)
Sir Anthony Babington aged 25 years
Anthony Babington was a Catholic nobleman who had helped to transport letters to Mary Queen of Scots. Babington hatched a plot to assassinate Queen Elizabeth and replace her with Mary Queen of Scots. The plot was discovered and Babington was arrested and tried. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered.
1586 (20th September)
Chidiock Tichborne aged 24 years
Chidiock was a Roman Catholic poet who continued to practice Catholicism after the religion was banned in England. He was a conspirator with Anthony Babington in a plot to assassinate Queen Elizabeth and replace her with Mary Queen of Scots. The plot was discovered and Tichborne was arrested and tried. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered.
1586 (21st September)
Thomas Salisbury aged 22 years
Salisbury was a conspirator with Anthony Babington in a plot to assassinate Queen Elizabeth and replace her with Mary Queen of Scots. The plot was discovered and Salisbury was arrested and tried. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered.
1586 (21st September)
John Ballard age unknown
Ballard was a Jesuit priest and a conspirator with Anthony Babington in a plot to assassinate Queen Elizabeth and replace her with Mary Queen of Scots. The plot was discovered and Ballard was arrested and tried. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered.
1586 (21st September)
Henry Donn age unknown
Henry Donn was a conspirator with Anthony Babington in a plot to assassinate Queen Elizabeth and replace her with Mary Queen of Scots. The plot was discovered and Salisbury was arrested and tried. He was executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered.
1587 (8th February)
Mary Queen of Scots aged 45 years
Mary Queen of Scots was the daughter of King James V of Scotland. She had become Queen of Scotland at just six days old but had been raised in Scotland for her safety. She married Francis of France then returned to Scotland after he died. She fell from favour after her husband was killed following an explosion and she was implicated in the murder. After being forced to abdicate in favour of her son, James VI she fled to England. Queen Elizabeth I kept her under house arrest but after plots to depose Elizabeth and put Mary on the throne she was executed by beheading.
1596 (29th November)
George Errington age unknown
George Errington was accused of trying to illegally convert people to Catholicism. He was found guilty and executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered at York.
1596 (29th November)
William Knight aged 24 years
William Knight was accused of trying to illegally convert people to Catholicism. He was found guilty and executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered at York.
1596 (29th November)
William Gibson aged 48 years
William Gibson was accused of trying to illegally convert people to Catholicism. He was found guilty and executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered at York.
1597 (4th July)
Henry Abbot age unknown
Henry Abbot was accused of trying to illegally convert people to Catholicism. He was found guilty and executed by being hanged, drawn and quartered at York.
1601 (25th February)
Robert Devereux Earl of Essex aged 36 years
Devereux was a nobleman and had been a favourite of Queen Elizabeth I. He fell from favour after failing to restore order in Ireland and becomming overly familiar with the Queen. He was charged with treason after a failed coup, found guilty and executed by beheading.
1601 (13th March)
Sir Gelli Meyrick aged about 45 years
Meyrick was a supporter of Robert Devereux and took part in a failed coup. He was charged with treason, found guilty and executed by hanging.
1601 (13th March)
Sir Henry Cuffe aged 38 years
Henry Cuffe was a supporter of Robert Devereux and took part in a failed coup. He was charged with treason, found guilty and executed.
1601 (18th March)
Sir Christopher Blount aged about 45 years
Blount was a leading supporter of Robert Devereux and took part in a failed coup. He was charged with treason, found guilty and executed by beheading.
1601 (18th March)
Sir Charles Danvers aged about 45 years
Danvers was a supporter of Robert Devereux and took part in a failed coup. He was charged with treason, found guilty and executed by beheading.

 

Published Sept 28, 2019 @ 8:50 pm – Updated – Nov 20, 2019 @ 3:15 pm

 

Harvard Reference for this page:

Heather Y Wheeler. (2019). Tudor Executions 1485 – 1603. Available: https://www.totallytimelines.com/tudor-executions-1485-1603 Last accessed December 8th, 2019